Center for Physical and Power Electronics

Graduate Students


Andrew Bowlen

Andrew Bowlen

Andrew Bowlen graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia in December of 2009 with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and a minor in Mathematics. Currently, he is devoted to his graduate research centered on the nonlinear response of various electronic components. During his graduate career, he setup an independent lab to aid with larger facilities on campus, purchased and assembled all lab equipment including a micro surface mount soldering and circuit fabrication station, and has maintained a 3.8 cumulative GPA. He hopes to graduate in December of 2011 with a M.S. in Electrical Engineering.
Kelton Clements

Kelton Clements

Currently a senior at the University of Missouri, Kelton is majoring in Electrical Engineering and has a minor in Mathematics.  In his undergraduate research, Kelton has helped to set up an RF test facility that utilizes an anechoic chamber to remove environmental RF noise.  Currently, he is exploring the area of high power microwaves and has been working on the design of a dual-vircator high power microwave source that is powered by a single pulsed power supply.  Upon graduating in May 2011, Kelton will continue his research and testing of the vircator source in his Master’s studies in the following fall semester.
Nathaniel Kinsey

Nathaniel Kinsey

Kinsey is currently a senior majoring in Electrical Engineering and minoring in Mathematics, hoping to purse a master’s degree. He started with the center in January of 2009 and has worked on several projects since. Some of his work has been the construction of an exposure method and facility for dielectric nano-particles, designing and executing of RF tests in our anechoic chamber, rebuilding of various pulse modulators and pulse forming networks, and is currently rebuilding a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. He hopes to study optics, photonics, semiconductors, and particle physics as he pursues his master’s research here at Mizzou. Kinsey also plans to pursue a PhD, and work doing research for the Department of Defense in the area of directed energy weapons and countermeasures.
Adam Lodes

Adam Lodes

Adam Lodes received dual B.S. degrees in electrical engineering as well as a BS in mathematics at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2007 where he is currently working toward a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering.

As an undergraduate he participated in the Honors Engineering Research Program with work in pulsed electric field sterilization.  For this work he has published and presented at the 2006 IEEE Power Modulator Conference.

He is currently a Graduate Research Assistant for the Center for Physical and Power Electronics at the University of Missouri-Columbia.  His research interests include air plasma sources, spectroscopy, plasma diagnostics, and pulse power systems. He has published at the 2009 IEEE Pulsed Power Conference for his graduate work, and is working toward several more publications.
Kevin A O’Connor

Kevin A O’Connor

Kevin O’Connor received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He is currently studying for the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering with an anticipated graduation date in 2011. Kevin completed an internship with Sandia National Laboratories and KTech Corp. in Albuquerque, NM in 2007. He has been a fellow of the National Physical Science Consortium since 2008.

In his masters-level research, Kevin investigated compact power conditioning and RF source components for explosive pulsed power systems, including air-core pulse transformers, exploding-wire fuses, and high voltage oscillators. His current research is on the development and characterization of high dielectric constant composite materials for high power components and the integration of these materials in compact antennas. In addition to the materials science effort to develop the composite materials, he has brought together a suite of diagnostics for low and high power electrical characterization of the materials and developed a high power antenna driver. Kevin has published 11 conference and journal articles. He is a member of IEEE, Sigma Xi, and Tau Beta Pi.

Mike RudroffMike Rudroff

As an undergraduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Mike was enrolled as a Bachelor of Science candidate for Computer Engineering, and holds a minor in both Mathematics and Computer Science.  Entering the graduate program as a Masters of Electrical Engineering and a Certificate in Nuclear Engineering candidate, he began research into optimizing atmospheric plasmas and shock wave generation.  As part of his masters, he designed and developed a shock tube trigger system to minimize jitter for synchronous events, as well as design and build test stands for generating an atmospheric plasma.  This includes the design and fabrication of a pulsed power system, shock tube, timing circuit, and diagnostics for the entire system. As a Masters student, he utilizes these designs in hopes to optimize his currently successful results.

Andrew Umenyiora

Andrew Umenyiora

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Chris Yeckel

Chris Yeckel

Christopher A. Yeckel (S'05) received his dual B.S. degrees in electrical engineering and computer engineering and his M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Missouri - Columbia, and will receive his Ph.D. degree later on this year. Chris' work has focused primarily on pulsed power systems and diagnostics. For his master's work, he developed an optical diagnostic system to determine the temperature of a breakdown arc in a megavolt gas switch. Chris is currently working on the physics of reducing the voltage breakdown jitter of high-pressure oil switches through manipulation of the oil's chemistry. The work required Chris to design and build a single-shot high-voltage test stand for experimental analysis. Chris has presented work and papers at five conferences and has published two journal articles in IEEE transactions with several more awaiting approval.

Mike Young

Mike Young

As an undergraduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia, Mike dual majored in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering and holds a minor in both Mathematics and Computer Science.  Entering the graduate program as a dual Masters/Ph.D. candidate, he began research into optimizing antenna design.  As part of his masters, he set up an antenna test facility to test the results of different antenna designs in an RF free environment.  This includes the setup of an anechoic chamber, the purchase of all necessary transmit and receive equipment, and construction of a composite material turntable.  As a Ph.D. student, he will utilize these facilities in order to investigate different antenna designs.  He currently has one publication with four more awaiting approval.
The Center for Physical and Power Electronics
Dr. Randy Curry
Phone: (573) 882-3017
Fax: (573) 882-0397
Email: curryrd@missouri.edu

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All Rights Reserved.